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Kenneth Carrico

V.O.L.S. Lead Graduate is New Farragut High Director of Bands

Kenneth Carrico completed the V.O.L.S. Lead online program, along with his principalship license, and graduated in May of 2018 with a Masters in Educational Administration.

Knoxville News Sentinel article: Click Here

(Photo courtesy of Michael Patrick/News Sentinel)

Chandra Harris-McCray, 2018 WPI Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Recipient

Congratulations to Chandra Harris-McCray, PhD student in Higher Education Administration, who is the recipient of the 2018 Women’s Philanthropy Institute Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. This fellowship will help Chandra complete her dissertation at the University of Tennessee Knoxville on African American alumnae philanthropy to institutions of higher education.

Chandra’s argument, informed by research as well as a decade of personal and professional experience, has led her to the premise that Women of Color, and in particular African America women, are often ignored and overlooked for their philanthropic potential. The implications for her findings go beyond identifying a new donor source, speaking more specifically to influence. Philanthropy and giving lends voice and authority which in turn can ignite change. As Chandra’s proposal demonstrated, diverse voices are missing from the perspectives of many organizations and agencies. Chandra’s study, framed in cogent theory, has the transformative potential to facilitate change.

Jacob Kamer

ELPS PhD Student Joining THEC for Summer

Jacob Kamer, a PhD student in the Higher Education Administration program, will join the Tennessee Higher Education Commission as an intern in the Planning and Research Bureau during the summer semester. During the academic year, Jacob serves as a graduate research assistant in the Center for Educational Leadership. Good luck in Nashville this summer, Jacob!

Big Orange Family Campaign

ELPS, PERC, & CEL Honored at Big Orange Family Campaign Celebration

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, including the Postsecondary Education Research Center and the Center for Educational Leadership, were honored at the Big Orange Family Campaign Celebration for achieving 100 percent participation among its faculty and staff.

The Big Orange Family Campaign is an annual month long initiative to enhance philanthropy among faculty and staff.  Last year, donations helped provide 6,148 undergraduate and graduate students with scholarships.  This year the Big Orange Family Campaign reached 59.56% participation, a full 5.5% higher than the campus-wide goal of 54%.

Read more about the Big Orange Family Campaign here

April 2018 Promising Practice

PERC publishes another Promising Practices for 2018 discussing results of results for Chattanooga State Community College’s “Focus on Completion.”

Promising Practices is an initiative sponsored by the Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The series highlights evidence-based practices promoting student success inclusive of access, persistence, retention, and postgraduate success.

Read more about April’s 2018 Promising Practice

Dr. Jim McIntyre Represents Tennessee on National Standards Setting Panel for Praxis School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA)

Dr. Jim McIntyre, Director of the Center for Educational Leadership, was recently in Princeton, New Jersey representing Tennessee in a multi-state standard setting process for the School Leader Licensure Assessment (SLLA).  The SLLA is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), which is headquartered in Princeton. Candidates for school principal licensure in Tennessee and several other states must demonstrate their knowledge of effective school leadership strategies, standards, and practices through the SLLA in order to become licensed to be a school principal.  Dr. McIntyre was nominated to participate by the Tennessee Department of Education and accepted by ETS.

Patrick Biddix to Teach NASPA Online Course on March 26, 2018

Patrick Biddix will join Joseph Levy and Rishi Sriram in teaching an online course hosted by The NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community.  The course titled, “Assessment versus Research.  What is the Difference?  Why Does It Matter?”, will help students to establish and clarify the language used for assessment and research, expectations of practitioners at multiple levels, and trends in the field.

As a result of attending the course, students will:

  • gain foundational knowledge about the concepts of assessment and research;
  • learn approaches to assessment and research based on definitions and philosophy;
  • apply assessment and research processes to student affairs practice; and
  • articulate the need for assessment and research skill development as professional practice.

The course will take place on March 26, 2018 at 1:00pm est.  It is free for members of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Research KC and $99 for non-members.

Read more about the course here

Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, Jimmy Cheek, Named 2018 United Way Campaign Chair

Jimmy Cheek, Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, will be taking on another new role for the year; the 2018 United Way Campaign Chair in addition to his role within our college. He will replace Ken Lowe, who over the course of 2017, raised almost fourteen million dollars for the organization. The United Way helps people by raising funds and supporting programs that provide opportunity and create lasting change in the community.  His efforts will help ensure a good life for all by funding essential programs.

In Fall 2017, Cheek joined the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. In addition to teaching graduate classes, Cheek has established and oversees the Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC). This center identifies, conducts and coordinates research on initiatives and ideas designed to enhance higher education at the institutional, state, and national levels to enhance policy and practice. Through this center, partnerships with organizations such as the Tennessee Board of Regents and the university system as well as several postsecondary institutions across the state will focus on improving higher education in Tennessee.

We congratulate you on this new appointment and wish you every success.

Story and photo compliments of CEHHS

Dorian McCoy and Gresham Collum

PERC’s Graduate Student Receives First Grant

Gresham Collom, a graduate research assistant for PERC, receives his first grant with Faculty member Dorian McCoy from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  This Student/Faculty Research Award will help support student research and foster the mentor relationship between faculty and graduate students.

The project titled. “Stories to be Told: Life-Course Narratives of Previously Incarcerated Persons” will identify the need here at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville to support previously incarcerated individuals and also work towards breaking barriers to their enrollment through recruitment initiatives.  Collom states. “By gathering rich, qualitative narratives from previously incarcerated person who have attended or wish to attend UTK, we hope to bring to light important stories which do no often get told.”

As a first year PhD student Collom is grateful for this opportunity and hopes everyone keeps an eye out for the results.

Big Orange College Tour

Has anyone ever told you to “never judge a book by its cover”? Well, I’m adding to the phrase: never judge an institution by its type.

College Student Personnel Universities VisitLast week, my graduate program of College Student Personnel spent three full days visiting Belmont University, Fisk University, the University of Tennessee at Martin, and West Kentucky Community Technical College to learn about how these institutions worked. While I will probably wait a while before hopping on a bus again, I am definitely thankful for the chance to see my learning in action. Meeting with student affairs professionals, asking questions, and looking behind-the-scenes at how students are served at each location allowed me to build a better picture of this field I’m learning about at the University of Tennessee.

The biggest lesson of the trip, though, was that my preconceived notions of what I thought I’d see were so wrong. My assumption that a small, rural community college wouldn’t be as impactful for students as a large, urban institution was shattered. I realized that, sometimes, tradition and a tight-knit community makes for a group of amazing student leaders. And I’m going to take this lesson into the rest of my career. As I continue my education at the University of Tennessee, I’m going to look for the gems within the University that make this institution amazing. I can’t wait to find them.

Story written by Madison Merrifield, graduate student in the College Student Personnel program in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Chris Ndiritu

CSP Student Receive SACSA Graduate Student Award

The College Student Personnel Program located in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies is proud to share that our 2018 Cohort student, Chris Ndiritu, has been awarded the Southern Association for College Student Affairs (SACSA) award for Outstanding Graduate Student for 2017.

Chris Ndiritu, Recipient of the SACSA Graduate Student AwardChris has demonstrated “academic achievement, campus involvement and potential for significant contributions to the Student Affairs profession” per the qualification guidelines for the award.  While working towards his degree, Chris is also an Assistant Hall Director for Hess Hall.

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates you Chris!  Read more about the SACSA; an organization “providing cooperative assocation and professional development for professionals engaged in college student affairs work.”

April Partin

Meet April Partin, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to April Partin.  April is an assistant principal at Green Magnet Academy. Previously, April served as an assistant principal at A. L. Lotts Elementary School. She also taught third- and fifth-grade students as a classroom teacher at A. L. Lotts and served as a lead teacher. April has a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in elementary education from UT, as well as an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

April is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, April will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, April will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations April for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Oscar Osorio

Meet Oscar Osorio, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Oscar Osorio.  Oscar is the assistant principal at Union Grove Middle School in Blount County. Prior to this appointment, he taught seventh and eighth grade science and served on the leadership team at Heritage Middle School. Before joining Blount County Schools in 2000, Osorio began his teaching career in Miami, Florida. Osorio has a bachelor’s degree from Florida International University as well as master’s degrees in science education and educational administration, supervision, and leadership from Nova Southeastern University.

Oscar is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Oscar will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Oscar will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Oscar for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Spencer Long

Meet Spencer Long, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Spencer Long.  Spencer is an assistant principal and athletic director at Karns High School. Spencer previously taught AP biology and anatomy and physiology at Halls High School, where he also served as a lead teacher. He began his teaching career at Jefferson County High School. Spencer has a bachelor’s degree in biology for health sciences from Carson-Newman University.

Spencer is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Spencer will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Spencer will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Spencer for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Anita Johnson

Meet Anita Johnson, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Anita Johnson.  Anita serves Austin-East High School as an administrative assistant. She served for many years as a secondary English teacher and teacher mentor at Bearden High School, and before that at Oak Ridge High School. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Florida State University.

Anita is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Anita will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Anita will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Anita for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Rachel Hodges

Meet Rachel Hodges, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Rachel Hodges. Rachel is a secondary English teacher and classroom support coach at Union County High School, where she has taught since 2013. She has served as a professional learning committee leader for the past few years, and sits on the school leadership committee. Hodges has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT and earned her teacher licensure through a post-baccalaureate program at Lincoln Memorial University.

Rachel is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rachel will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Rachel will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Rachel for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Shaunna Foster

Meet Shaunna Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Shaunna Foster.  Shaunna is an instructional coach who has served Green Magnet Academy and Chilhowee Intermediate School. Shaunna was previously a teacher at Belle Morris Elementary School for several years after a professional job in the private sector. She has a bachelor’s degree in business management from Austin Peay State University as well as master’s degree in curriculum and instruction and an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

Shaunna is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Shaunna will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Shaunna will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Shaunna for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Rukiya Foster

Meet Rukiya Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Rukiya Foster. Rukiya is a Spanish teacher and World Languages Department head at Austin-East Magnet High School. Previously, Rukiya taught Spanish at Farragut High School. She has been involved with the Project GRAD summer institute and serves as the administrative coordinator for Austin-East Roadrunner football. Rukiya has a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and a master’s degree in secondary education from UT.

Rukiya is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rukiya will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership. Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership. Upon successful completion of the program, Rukiya will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Rukiya for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Michelle Clayton

Meet Michelle Clayton, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Michelle Clayton. Michelle serves West High School as an administrative assistant. She has significant school leadership experience, having served as the correctional principal at the Mountain View Youth Development Center and as teaching principal for the New Pathways Academy at the Florence Crittenton Agency. Michelle also taught at Richard Yoakley Alternative School. She has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and history from the University of South Alabama and a master’s degree in educational administration from UT.

Michelle is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Michelle will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Michelle will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Michelle for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Riley Brewer

Meet Riley Brewer, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Riley Brewer. Riley is a master teacher at Carter High School, where she provides instructional coaching support to teachers as well as developmental evaluative feedback.  She previously served as an English teacher for grades 10 through 12 and as a mentor teacher at Carter High School,.  She began her teaching career at Rhea County High School.  Riley has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education English from Tennessee Technological University.

Riley is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Riley will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Riley will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Riley for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Jamie Bowman

Meet Jamie Bowman, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Jamie Bowman. Jamie is an assistant principal at Horace Maynard Middle School in Union County.  She previously served as an instructional facilitator and sixth grade English/Language Arts teacher at Maynard Middle.  Jamie has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT as well as a Master of Education degree in administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

Jamie is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Jamie will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Jamie will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Jamie for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Megan Blevins

Meet Megan Blevins, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Megan Blevins. Megan, a school administrator at Mooreland Heights Elementary School, has been with Knox County Schools since 2007. She has broad experience as a classroom teacher, having first taught first and second grade at Ritta and Carter Elementary Schools and as an ESL teacher at several schools. She has also served in the system-wide role of district lead teacher. Megan has a bachelors degree in elementary education and a master’s in teaching degree from the University of Arkansas.

Megan is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Megan will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Megan will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Megan for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Molly Rice

Meet Molly Rice, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Molly Rice.  Molly is the assistant principal at Sam Houston Elementary School in Maryville. Prior to this appointment, she had been a classroom teacher at Sam Houston Elementary, serving third and fourth grades. Molly began her teaching career in Westmoreland, Kansas. She has a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from UT.

Molly is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s  Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Molly will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Molly will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Molly for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

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