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Mary Lynne Derrington presenting in Scotland

Derrington Works With Scottish School Leaders in Glasgow

Mary Lynne Derrington, Associate Professor in the department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, was invited to work with Scottish school leaders on global perspectives of principal and teacher evaluation systems November 20-24, 2018. Following her presentation Supervising and Evaluating Principals:  Assisting with Challenges, she met with University of Glasgow academic staff, leadership programs heads, and national school inspectors in a discussion seminar. Later that day she met with principals and PhD students. Following a presentation, Supervising and Evaluating Teachers in an Era of Policy Mandates, there was a question and answer exchange.

While in Glasgow, Derrington also delivered two presentation at the Scottish Educational Research Association. Her presentation, Using Longitudinal Qualitative Research to Examine Change Over Time was based on her just released Sage Publications book. She also presented, with University of Glasgow faculty, in an invited seminar on Middle Leadership in Schools, the Critical Axis for Change and Improvement.

UTK Attends SACSA Conference in Myrtle Beach, SC

UTK Attends Southern Association for College Student Affairs (SACSA) Conference in Myrtle Beach, SC

More than 40 University of Tennessee Knoxville students (undergraduates and CSP – College Student Personnel), faculty, and Division of Student Life practitioner-educators recently attended the 2018 SACSA Conference in Myrtle Beach, SC (November 3-5, 2018).   Below are several highlights from the annual conference.

  • Tanisha Jenkins (ELPS Doctoral Candidate; Director, UTK Office of Multicultural Student Life) presided over the 2018 conference serving as SACSA President.
  • Luke Sciuilli (Cohort 2019), Aaron Dixon, Karen Boyd, Talisha Adams, Kelly Phillips, Kerri Lovegrove, Abby Grogan, Danny Glassman, Lori Smith, and David Ndiaye presented at the conference.
  • Luke Sciulli (Cohort 2019) and Madison Merrifield (Cohort 2019) finished 1st in the Case Study Competition. Each received a $150 award.
  • Karis Hill (Cohort 2020) and Olivia Stevens (Cohort 2020) finished 2nd in the Case Study Competition. Each received a $100 award. (There were 13 teams in the case study competition).
  • Jheri Wills (Cohort 2019) was the first SACSA Presidential Intern and chaired the Graduate Student Symposium.
  • Dorian McCoy was awarded the SACSA/CAS Ted K. Miller Award for Excellence (to recognize outstanding accomplishments in advancing standards of practice and quality assurance in educational programs and services in higher education).
  • We had approximately 30 members of the Vol Nation attend dinner Sunday at the Flying Fish.  Thanks to Abigail Brumfield for organizing. Tanisha Jenkins hosted a reception in the Presidential Suite after dinner (just for the Vol Nation).
  • Chris Ndiritu (Cohort 2018) chaired the Undergraduate Symposium.
  • The UT Baskets auctioned for $155.  For the second consecutive year, the UT Baskets generated the most dollars for the SACSA Foundation. Basket 1 auctioned for $100 and Basket 2 auctioned for $55.  Thanks Karis for “putting together” the baskets.
Rachel Hodges and Michelle Clayton, from Cohort 8 of the Leadership Academy

Angelle and McIntyre to Present at Annual UCEA Convention in Houston

Pamela Angelle and Jim McIntyre will jointly present a paper entitled “Aspiring Leader Internship Experiences in a Full Time and Online Internship” at the annual meeting of the University Council for Education Administration in Houston, Texas, on November 16, 2018. The paper explores the common elements of success between the non-traditional aspiring school leader internships offered by the University of Tennessee’s two prinicpal preparation programs, VOLS Lead and the Leadership Academy. (Pictured above are Rachel Hodges and Michelle Clayton, from the 2017-2018 Leadership Academy Cohort)

Higher Education Professor and PhD Student are Published in a Leading Journal in Their Field

Congratulations to Dr. Terry Ishitani, Associate Professor of Higher Education, and Lee D. Flood, Higher Education PhD student, whose article “Student Transfer-Out Behavior at Four-Year Institutions” is listed first in the November 2018 issue of Research in Higher Education, one of the leading journals in the Higher Education field.

V.O.L.S. Lead Online Program at The University of Tennessee – Knoxville made the ranking of 24th for Master’s Degrees in Educational Leadership.

SR Education Group, a leading education research publisher founded in 2004, has just unveiled their 2019 rankings on GuidetoOnlineSchools.com.The new best online colleges lists are the first to offer all-encompassing rankings of online colleges using up-to-date alumni salary data from PayScale and tuition rates across degree level and program. Inclusion on this list shows high return on investment and commitment to affordability, two key factors for prospective students. The University of Tennessee – Knoxville made the ranking at 24th for Master’s Degrees in Educational Leadership.

The full list is available here: https://www.guidetoonlineschools.com/degrees/educational-leadership#best-value-masters

The methodology for these rankings employs median mid-career salary data, as well as manually researched tuition rates. Since salaries differ by degree level and program, SR Education Group utilizes bachelor’s, master’s, and program specific salary data for the rankings. Manually collected tuition rates are also specific to degree level and program.

“We are excited to offer the most comprehensive and diverse collection of online school and program rankings. Our resources give prospective students transparent and accessible information to help them make important decisions about investments in their education and future career paths,” said Sung Rhee, CEO of SR Education Group.

Derrington Presents at COPIS Annual Conference

Mary Lynne Derrington, Associate Professor in Educational Administration, presented a paper titled, “Longitudinal Qualitative Research: A Method for Understanding Change in Teacher Evaluation and Supervision Practice and Perceptions” on October 13, 2018, at the annual conference of the Council of Professors of Instructional Supervision (COPIS), at The University of Maine. Membership in COPIS is by nomination and limited to 100 prominent national researchers in the field of supervision and instructional leadership.

NREA-Awards-AsPIRE-2018-UTK

UT Center for Educational Leadership Recognized with National Award

The National Rural Education Association (NREA) has recognized the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Center for Educational Leadership with the 2018 NREA Exemplary Practices Award for its Administrators Planning Innovation for Rural Education (AsPIRE) rural school leadership initiatve.

The NREA Exemplary Practices Award is given to an individual or organization for demonstrating exemplary practice in one or more of the following areas: curriculum or staff development to provide more equitable educational opportunities for rural children, enhancement of communications within and among local school districts, promotion and development of state and rural delivery systems, curriculum planning and/or instructional strategies to utilize effectively the rural environment, and financial efficiency in school operations.

The award was received at the annual NREA Convention on Friday, October 12, by public school principals Christie Amburn and Ginny McElhaney, both participants in AsPIRE. Amburn is the principal at Loudon Elementary School in Loudon County, Tennessee, and principal at the Washburn School in Grainger County, Tennessee.

AsPIRE is a unique collaborative effort to enhance rural school leadership in Tennessee,facilitated by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and funded by SCORE and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The initiative was developed to address the challenges of rural school leaders, including a diverse array of responsibilities, limited quality learning opportunities, and the scarcity of mentoring and professional networks.

AsPIRE represents a groundbreaking principal-driven delivery system of collaborative professional learning experiences to support and develop exceptional rural school leadership. Participating principals have designed and are implementing a series of collaborative professional learning opportunities for their rural colleagues, including mastermind groups and a cohort learning experience.

“These collaborative learning experiences are bringing together small groups of rural principals to learn with and from each other,” said Jim McIntyre, director of the Center for Educational Leadership and facilitator of the AsPIRE initiative. “Through this innovative programming, rural school principals will explore and address shared problems of practice, enhance knowledge in critical areas, cooperatively problem solve, and develop strong professional support networks.”

The Center for Educational Leadership began in 2010 as a collaborative effort between UT’s College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences and local school districts to grow and support the next generation of outstanding school principals and to meaningfully enhance educational leadership in Tennessee.

CONTACT:

Jules Morris (julesmo@utk.edu, 865-719-7072)

Grant Kobes

Honors Leadership Program Student Leads Vex U Robotics Team to World Championship and International Community Service Award in its First Year

It is common to find Leadership Studies minor students in the traditionally recognized student leadership positions and honors. Each graduating class of the Leadership Studies minor, since its inception in Fall 2015, has included at least one TorchBearer and Chancellors Honors Award recipients including 2 Extraordinary Campus Leadership and Service recipients. By its 4th graduating class in Spring 2019, the LSM alumni will include 5 student government executive officers (including 2 presidents and 2 vice presidents) and a President of the Panhellenic Council. It might be helpful to share that in addition to our students graduating as exemplary student leaders, this year a freshman pursuing the honors leadership studies minor and a member of the inaugural Honors Leadership Program shows what our students can do with a little support and nudge.

Grant Kobes – a first year Honors Leadership Program student completing an assignment for his first foundations of leadership course within the minor – created a strategic leadership plan to found and serve as the chief engineer for UTK’s Vex U Robotics Team, YNOT.  Grant secured a team mentor and started a new student organization after writing a budget, constitution, holding interest meetings/ individual member skills evaluations/ and officer elections.  His team spent the fall serving as volunteer referees and judges at high school events in order to gain experience with game strategy.  With no sponsor or work space, Grant and his teammates created their first robot iteration in the floor of his dorm room!  Team YNOT had an amazing first season, ranking 5th in world in autonomous programming and driver skills, and competing at the 2018 Vex Robotics World Championship.

One of Grant’s top leadership goals is reflected in Team YNOT’s mission statement: a focus on mentoring younger teams in the Knoxville community. Their work last year included creating an alliance of more than 15 area high school teams, all of which were personally coached by UTK’s team members.  The impact of this collaboration was recognized and praised by judges, resulting in team YNOT receiving the prestigious Community Award at this year’s World Championship.  This award is presented to the university level team that has demonstrated the most meaningful leadership and influence toward promoting STEM education in their local community.  Grant’s goal is to use competitive robotics to recruit the most talented high school students from the Knoxville area to the Tickle College of Engineering in the coming years.

Grant was also honored with an invitation to attend the 2018 Vex Robotics Event Partner Summit in Greenville, Texas.  This all-expense paid trip allowed leaders in Vex robotics from around the world a chance to meet at Vex headquarters to discuss the coming season.  As the youngest attendee in Vex history, Grant connected with many key individuals at both the state and national level.

This summer, Grant recruited over 50 new members while promoting his team at 11 of 13 orientation sessions.  His leadership philosophy focuses on personally getting to know each perspective student’s strengths and interests so that he can help them become a valued team member.  Grant invites anyone interested to contact him at gkobes@vols.utk.edu or the team Instagram @YNOTrobotics.

Kenneth Carrico

V.O.L.S. Lead Graduate is New Farragut High Director of Bands

Kenneth Carrico completed the V.O.L.S. Lead online program, along with his principalship license, and graduated in May of 2018 with a Masters in Educational Administration.

Knoxville News Sentinel article: Click Here

(Photo courtesy of Michael Patrick/News Sentinel)

Chandra Harris-McCray, 2018 WPI Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Recipient

Congratulations to Chandra Harris-McCray, PhD student in Higher Education Administration, who is the recipient of the 2018 Women’s Philanthropy Institute Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. This fellowship will help Chandra complete her dissertation at the University of Tennessee Knoxville on African American alumnae philanthropy to institutions of higher education.

Chandra’s argument, informed by research as well as a decade of personal and professional experience, has led her to the premise that Women of Color, and in particular African America women, are often ignored and overlooked for their philanthropic potential. The implications for her findings go beyond identifying a new donor source, speaking more specifically to influence. Philanthropy and giving lends voice and authority which in turn can ignite change. As Chandra’s proposal demonstrated, diverse voices are missing from the perspectives of many organizations and agencies. Chandra’s study, framed in cogent theory, has the transformative potential to facilitate change.

Jacob Kamer

ELPS PhD Student Joining THEC for Summer

Jacob Kamer, a PhD student in the Higher Education Administration program, will join the Tennessee Higher Education Commission as an intern in the Planning and Research Bureau during the summer semester. During the academic year, Jacob serves as a graduate research assistant in the Center for Educational Leadership. Good luck in Nashville this summer, Jacob!

Big Orange Family Campaign

ELPS, PERC, & CEL Honored at Big Orange Family Campaign Celebration

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, including the Postsecondary Education Research Center and the Center for Educational Leadership, were honored at the Big Orange Family Campaign Celebration for achieving 100 percent participation among its faculty and staff.

The Big Orange Family Campaign is an annual month long initiative to enhance philanthropy among faculty and staff.  Last year, donations helped provide 6,148 undergraduate and graduate students with scholarships.  This year the Big Orange Family Campaign reached 59.56% participation, a full 5.5% higher than the campus-wide goal of 54%.

Read more about the Big Orange Family Campaign here

April 2018 Promising Practice

PERC publishes another Promising Practices for 2018 discussing results of results for Chattanooga State Community College’s “Focus on Completion.”

Promising Practices is an initiative sponsored by the Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The series highlights evidence-based practices promoting student success inclusive of access, persistence, retention, and postgraduate success.

Read more about April’s 2018 Promising Practice

Dr. Jim McIntyre Represents Tennessee on National Standards Setting Panel for Praxis School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA)

Dr. Jim McIntyre, Director of the Center for Educational Leadership, was recently in Princeton, New Jersey representing Tennessee in a multi-state standard setting process for the School Leader Licensure Assessment (SLLA).  The SLLA is administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), which is headquartered in Princeton. Candidates for school principal licensure in Tennessee and several other states must demonstrate their knowledge of effective school leadership strategies, standards, and practices through the SLLA in order to become licensed to be a school principal.  Dr. McIntyre was nominated to participate by the Tennessee Department of Education and accepted by ETS.

Patrick Biddix to Teach NASPA Online Course on March 26, 2018

Patrick Biddix will join Joseph Levy and Rishi Sriram in teaching an online course hosted by The NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community.  The course titled, “Assessment versus Research.  What is the Difference?  Why Does It Matter?”, will help students to establish and clarify the language used for assessment and research, expectations of practitioners at multiple levels, and trends in the field.

As a result of attending the course, students will:

  • gain foundational knowledge about the concepts of assessment and research;
  • learn approaches to assessment and research based on definitions and philosophy;
  • apply assessment and research processes to student affairs practice; and
  • articulate the need for assessment and research skill development as professional practice.

The course will take place on March 26, 2018 at 1:00pm est.  It is free for members of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Research KC and $99 for non-members.

Read more about the course here

Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, Jimmy Cheek, Named 2018 United Way Campaign Chair

Jimmy Cheek, Chancellor Emeritus and Distinguished Professor, will be taking on another new role for the year; the 2018 United Way Campaign Chair in addition to his role within our college. He will replace Ken Lowe, who over the course of 2017, raised almost fourteen million dollars for the organization. The United Way helps people by raising funds and supporting programs that provide opportunity and create lasting change in the community.  His efforts will help ensure a good life for all by funding essential programs.

In Fall 2017, Cheek joined the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. In addition to teaching graduate classes, Cheek has established and oversees the Postsecondary Education Research Center (PERC). This center identifies, conducts and coordinates research on initiatives and ideas designed to enhance higher education at the institutional, state, and national levels to enhance policy and practice. Through this center, partnerships with organizations such as the Tennessee Board of Regents and the university system as well as several postsecondary institutions across the state will focus on improving higher education in Tennessee.

We congratulate you on this new appointment and wish you every success.

Story and photo compliments of CEHHS

Dorian McCoy and Gresham Collum

PERC’s Graduate Student Receives First Grant

Gresham Collom, a graduate research assistant for PERC, receives his first grant with Faculty member Dorian McCoy from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.  This Student/Faculty Research Award will help support student research and foster the mentor relationship between faculty and graduate students.

The project titled. “Stories to be Told: Life-Course Narratives of Previously Incarcerated Persons” will identify the need here at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville to support previously incarcerated individuals and also work towards breaking barriers to their enrollment through recruitment initiatives.  Collom states. “By gathering rich, qualitative narratives from previously incarcerated person who have attended or wish to attend UTK, we hope to bring to light important stories which do no often get told.”

As a first year PhD student Collom is grateful for this opportunity and hopes everyone keeps an eye out for the results.

Big Orange College Tour

Has anyone ever told you to “never judge a book by its cover”? Well, I’m adding to the phrase: never judge an institution by its type.

College Student Personnel Universities VisitLast week, my graduate program of College Student Personnel spent three full days visiting Belmont University, Fisk University, the University of Tennessee at Martin, and West Kentucky Community Technical College to learn about how these institutions worked. While I will probably wait a while before hopping on a bus again, I am definitely thankful for the chance to see my learning in action. Meeting with student affairs professionals, asking questions, and looking behind-the-scenes at how students are served at each location allowed me to build a better picture of this field I’m learning about at the University of Tennessee.

The biggest lesson of the trip, though, was that my preconceived notions of what I thought I’d see were so wrong. My assumption that a small, rural community college wouldn’t be as impactful for students as a large, urban institution was shattered. I realized that, sometimes, tradition and a tight-knit community makes for a group of amazing student leaders. And I’m going to take this lesson into the rest of my career. As I continue my education at the University of Tennessee, I’m going to look for the gems within the University that make this institution amazing. I can’t wait to find them.

Story written by Madison Merrifield, graduate student in the College Student Personnel program in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

Chris Ndiritu

CSP Student Receive SACSA Graduate Student Award

The College Student Personnel Program located in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies is proud to share that our 2018 Cohort student, Chris Ndiritu, has been awarded the Southern Association for College Student Affairs (SACSA) award for Outstanding Graduate Student for 2017.

Chris Ndiritu, Recipient of the SACSA Graduate Student AwardChris has demonstrated “academic achievement, campus involvement and potential for significant contributions to the Student Affairs profession” per the qualification guidelines for the award.  While working towards his degree, Chris is also an Assistant Hall Director for Hess Hall.

The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences congratulates you Chris!  Read more about the SACSA; an organization “providing cooperative assocation and professional development for professionals engaged in college student affairs work.”

April Partin

Meet April Partin, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to April Partin.  April is an assistant principal at Green Magnet Academy. Previously, April served as an assistant principal at A. L. Lotts Elementary School. She also taught third- and fifth-grade students as a classroom teacher at A. L. Lotts and served as a lead teacher. April has a bachelor’s degree in communications and a master’s degree in elementary education from UT, as well as an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

April is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, April will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, April will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations April for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Oscar Osorio

Meet Oscar Osorio, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Oscar Osorio.  Oscar is the assistant principal at Union Grove Middle School in Blount County. Prior to this appointment, he taught seventh and eighth grade science and served on the leadership team at Heritage Middle School. Before joining Blount County Schools in 2000, Osorio began his teaching career in Miami, Florida. Osorio has a bachelor’s degree from Florida International University as well as master’s degrees in science education and educational administration, supervision, and leadership from Nova Southeastern University.

Oscar is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Oscar will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Oscar will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Oscar for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Spencer Long

Meet Spencer Long, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Spencer Long.  Spencer is an assistant principal and athletic director at Karns High School. Spencer previously taught AP biology and anatomy and physiology at Halls High School, where he also served as a lead teacher. He began his teaching career at Jefferson County High School. Spencer has a bachelor’s degree in biology for health sciences from Carson-Newman University.

Spencer is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Spencer will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Spencer will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Spencer for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Anita Johnson

Meet Anita Johnson, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Anita Johnson.  Anita serves Austin-East High School as an administrative assistant. She served for many years as a secondary English teacher and teacher mentor at Bearden High School, and before that at Oak Ridge High School. She has a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Florida State University.

Anita is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Anita will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Anita will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Anita for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Rachel Hodges

Meet Rachel Hodges, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Rachel Hodges. Rachel is a secondary English teacher and classroom support coach at Union County High School, where she has taught since 2013. She has served as a professional learning committee leader for the past few years, and sits on the school leadership committee. Hodges has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT and earned her teacher licensure through a post-baccalaureate program at Lincoln Memorial University.

Rachel is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rachel will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Rachel will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Rachel for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Shaunna Foster

Meet Shaunna Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Shaunna Foster.  Shaunna is an instructional coach who has served Green Magnet Academy and Chilhowee Intermediate School. Shaunna was previously a teacher at Belle Morris Elementary School for several years after a professional job in the private sector. She has a bachelor’s degree in business management from Austin Peay State University as well as master’s degree in curriculum and instruction and an Education Specialist degree in educational administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

Shaunna is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Shaunna will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Shaunna will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Shaunna for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Rukiya Foster

Meet Rukiya Foster, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Rukiya Foster. Rukiya is a Spanish teacher and World Languages Department head at Austin-East Magnet High School. Previously, Rukiya taught Spanish at Farragut High School. She has been involved with the Project GRAD summer institute and serves as the administrative coordinator for Austin-East Roadrunner football. Rukiya has a bachelor’s degree in Spanish and a master’s degree in secondary education from UT.

Rukiya is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Rukiya will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership. Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership. Upon successful completion of the program, Rukiya will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Rukiya for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Michelle Clayton

Meet Michelle Clayton, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Michelle Clayton. Michelle serves West High School as an administrative assistant. She has significant school leadership experience, having served as the correctional principal at the Mountain View Youth Development Center and as teaching principal for the New Pathways Academy at the Florence Crittenton Agency. Michelle also taught at Richard Yoakley Alternative School. She has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education and history from the University of South Alabama and a master’s degree in educational administration from UT.

Michelle is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Michelle will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Michelle will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Michelle for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Riley Brewer

Meet Riley Brewer, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Riley Brewer. Riley is a master teacher at Carter High School, where she provides instructional coaching support to teachers as well as developmental evaluative feedback.  She previously served as an English teacher for grades 10 through 12 and as a mentor teacher at Carter High School,.  She began her teaching career at Rhea County High School.  Riley has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education English from Tennessee Technological University.

Riley is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Riley will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Riley will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Riley for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Jamie Bowman

Meet Jamie Bowman, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Jamie Bowman. Jamie is an assistant principal at Horace Maynard Middle School in Union County.  She previously served as an instructional facilitator and sixth grade English/Language Arts teacher at Maynard Middle.  Jamie has a bachelor’s degree in political science from UT as well as a Master of Education degree in administration and supervision from Lincoln Memorial University.

Jamie is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Jamie will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Jamie will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Jamie for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Megan Blevins

Meet Megan Blevins, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Megan Blevins. Megan, a school administrator at Mooreland Heights Elementary School, has been with Knox County Schools since 2007. She has broad experience as a classroom teacher, having first taught first and second grade at Ritta and Carter Elementary Schools and as an ESL teacher at several schools. She has also served in the system-wide role of district lead teacher. Megan has a bachelors degree in elementary education and a master’s in teaching degree from the University of Arkansas.

Megan is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Megan will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Megan will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Megan for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

Molly Rice

Meet Molly Rice, 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellow

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies would like to introduce you to Molly Rice.  Molly is the assistant principal at Sam Houston Elementary School in Maryville. Prior to this appointment, she had been a classroom teacher at Sam Houston Elementary, serving third and fourth grades. Molly began her teaching career in Westmoreland, Kansas. She has a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from UT.

Molly is one of 15 fellows chosen for the 2017-18 Center for Educational Leadership’s  Leadership Academy based in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. During this full-time, intensive 15-month fellowship program, Molly will spend four days a week at a school with an experienced mentor principal and a fifth day in coursework and seminars with professors and expert practitioner partners learning the research and theory behind great school leadership.  Next, all the fellows will lead an action research capstone project that integrates their learning across the many curricular areas of the academy, and complete an electronic portfolio documenting proficiency in school leadership.  Upon successful completion of the program, Molly will be awarded a master’s or educational specialist degree and will be eligible to earn a license to be a school principal in Tennessee.

Congratulations Molly for being selected as one of the 2017-18 Leadership Academy Fellows!

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